5 Things That Will Help You Cope With the Death of a Parent

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Losing a loved one is already hard enough. However, when you add the fact that the loss is of your parent to the equation, the emotional results can be catastrophic. Unfortunately, many people take their parents for granted until they are gone, and do not know how to cope with their passing. It’s not an easy journey in the beginning. If you’re currently in the position where you’ve lost your parent, know that you can walk through this journey, and it is possible to discover joy again. The grief won’t always feel as all-encompassing as it does right now. Consider the following ways you can begin to cope with the death of your parent.

Find some enjoyable activities

Traveling, cooking and music are great hobbies to immerse yourself into when you’re looking for healing. As you focus on rebuilding and coping with the loss, it’s a wise idea to consider the activities that bring joy. It’s also a great time to start new traditions and cultivate new hobbies that will help you cope. It may be difficult at first to spend time with hobbies that remind you of your parents at first, but do not let that keep you from finding ways to unwind. It is okay to take a break from cooking if you used to do that with your dad and find it hard to do certain recipes without him. On the other hand, doing a hobby your parent used to enjoy could also help you feel closer to them  even after they are gone.

Figure out what works for you

For many people, looking at old photos helps to get a sense of closeness. For others, looking at photos creates the onset of a depressed episode For some people, it doesn’t matter which funeral home they choose for the services. For others, it’s important to find a funeral home that offers cremation services like Damar Kaminski Funeral Home & Crematorium. Funeral planning could be a way to help you cope, or it could be a difficult task you prefer to leave to others. Don’t feel pressured to have a certain eulogy or follow a certain trend regarding the funeral. Choose what will be best for you and your loved ones. Don’t focus so much on what other people have done in the past to cope. Grief is an individual journey. Focus on what works for you.

Enlist the help of friends and family

It’s not healthy to be alone all the time. You need people in order to get through different experiences in life. When people offer help, take it. If you need someone to watch the kids while you get a break, it’s okay to ask for help. It doesn’t make you weak. By enlisting the help of your friends and family, you will strengthen bonds and be better able to handle this emotionally charged time. It may be tempting to push others away and overwork yourself to distract yourself from the process of grieving, but you will have to confront your grief sooner or later. It is okay to let your friends and family know you need help. It is also okay to tell them you need space. Take the time to communicate so they know what will be best for you.

See a therapist

Losing your parent is an experience that can potentially break you. This is why it’s best to call in the professionals. As you talk through your experiences and vent, you’ll be able to get a breakthrough and experience healing. Prioritize grief counseling.

Live in honor of them

It’s important to be mindful of how you live moving forward. Think about what they would’ve wanted. They wouldn’t want your life to stop because they passed. They’d want you to keep going. Whether you start a scholarship in their name or focus on living a life that’s filled with the morals they taught you, live in honor of them.

While grief is an emotion, it can also be described as a journey. The first year or two might feel like a blur. However, as you focus on taking each day as it comes, implementing these tips and doing your best, you’ll be able to cope, survive and then, thrive in the face of loss.